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Margaret Whitlam Galleries

All Most Famous

Dana Creedon

Light Shaft
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.73 cm

David Morgan

Rolling Your Own
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.67 cm

Eleni Parisis

Slice
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.67 cm

Jonathon Kwok

Car Park Dance
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.86 cm

Karishma Prakash

Mime Artist
Digital Print
2012
28 x 17.96 cm

Kevin To

Cow Head
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.54 cm

Ryan Morgan

Mudman
Digital Print
2012
28 x 19.92 cm

Rhys Phillips

Two Rings
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.59 cm

Natalie Madik

Tongue Reflector
Digital Print
2012
28 x 19.20 cm

Steven Savona

Charlotte Dawson
Digital Print
2012
28 x 23.35 cm

Samantha Williams

Choke
Digital Print
2012
28 x 22.45 cm

Amy Sherden

Bomb Disposal
Digital Print
2012
28 x 19.07 cm

Ashleigh Berry

Cowboy with Machine Gun
Digital Print
2012
28 x 21.81 cm

Christine Gauci

Fortune Teller
Digital Print
2012
28 x 21.25 cm

Holly Pederson

Delta Goodrem and Fan
Digital Print
2012
28 x 20.45 cm

Hussein Hawli

Push
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.86 cm

Laura Sinclair

Ballerina Step
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.67 cm

Michael Cruz

Beautiful Hood
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.74

Rafael Lerion

Priest at Window
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.45 cm

Toby Francis

The work of Adrian Francis
Digital Print
2012
28 x 18.67 cm

Venue
The Margaret Whitlam Galleries, within the Female Orphan School (Building EZ) (View Map)
Date
26 Nov 2012 - 1 Mar 2013
Open
Monday - Friday: 10:00 am - 4:00 pm by appointment

This student show is the first discrete exhibition of photographic work from Design and Communication students studying Photo Journalism. All of the images were made during Spring Semester 2012 and exhibition comprises twenty selected images showing at the UWS Parramatta Campus Margaret Whitlam Galleries 26 November/1 March 2012.

Students enrol within the unit of study Photo Journalism with a wide disparity of interest, skills and experience of photography. Some students have little if any experience of using photography and others have studied to an intermediate level. All students are introduced to the basic knowledge required to work with digital photography in terms of cameras, lighting and production to an operational and fairly sophisticated level. The shift to complete digital operation has freed up good teaching and learning time available to develop ideation with a greater understanding of what constitutes Photo Journalism.

Photo Journalism is akin to Documentary Photography, both forms of photographic practice aim to produce a ‘document’ that, because of the tiny but critical essence of what constitutes any photograph, realism. Every photograph must be a photograph of ‘something’, a little piece of the world that communicates experientially more than symbolically. And, as document the photographic image is portable and repeatable it can reveal that which most people would not see in the normal concourse of daily life.

In that way photojournalism is revealing and provides witness.

Students are taught that all aspects of the medium are in play to deliver meaning with maximum impact, and that includes quality of exposure, sharp focus, blur, lighting, framing, compositing, tonality, colour and so on are all critical elements in the delivery of meaning.

Photo Journalism is particularly a people orientated business, it requires engagement with people, there is no implication here that all Photo Journalists need be extrovert, and indeed many photographers have this sense that they are almost invisible, that they exist the other side of the lens. However, Photo Journalists do need to engage with people, a basic principle is that ‘it’s no good coming back with pics of the backs of people’s head’. Photo Journalists are not paparazzi, there’s requirement that photographers are able to approach people with respect but to engage them to ‘perform’ in a way that composes well in the camera and delivers the meaning, the truth of any given situation.

The titling of this show is All Most Famous, students were encouraged to find ‘someone famous’ or ‘nearly famous’ and include that subject within all assignments throughout Spring Semester. A considerable number found this difficult, but the effort required to go beyond the usual bounds of production required within class, extended the imagination of the students and at least produced more interesting and viable images than would have been the case.

Dr David Cubby
Matt Sullivan
Photo Journalism Spring 2012