Name*
Surname*
Address
Email Address*
Mobile
* Required fields

Margaret Whitlam Galleries

Vulgo (Alias) by Rosângela Rennó

Scar (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Scorpion (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Phoenix (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Double Crown (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Volcan (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Number (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Down (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Whip (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Three Holes (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Fire (from the Penitentiary Museum of Sao Paolo files)

Novojet print on vinyl
112 x 155 cm
1996 - 1999

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Installation shot of Vulgo (Alias) Exhibition

Venue
The Margaret Whitlam Galleries, within the Female Orphan School (Building EZ) (View Map)
Date
26 Nov 2012 - 1 Mar 2013
Open
Monday - Friday: 10:00 am - 4:00 pm by appointment

For an invitation to the exhibition, please see Vulgo (Alias) Invitation (JPG, 36.8 KB)

Rosângela Rennó’s, Vulgo (Alias) installation was the culmination of a visiting fellowship at UWS-Nepean in 1999, and were first exhibited at The Australian Centre for Photography.

These photographs originated from glass negatives in the Sao Paulo Penitentiary Archive,Brazil, which were identification photographs of prisoners, taken between 1920 and 1940.

Archives particularly interest Rennó because they are stored testimonies and traces of a past that is kept locked and forgotten most of the time, as are prisoners. Geczy (1999.38) suggests that,

“Incarceration is, as we know, a process of making people absent, sequesting them from public view.”

Rennó’s photographs are recovered fragments from a decaying prison archive which highlights the gaps in memory and the history of those prisoners.